Schizopolis

Phew.

After a couple of weeks of emotionally draining films that forced us to confront some dark aspects of humanity, the Collection serves us up a heaping helping of...something completely different.

The nadir of Stephen Soderbergh's career, Schizopolis seems to be an attempt to excise all of the bad ideas he was having and put them into a single film that also doubles as a sort of 8 1/2-style self-reflexive critique. 8 1/2 is an infinitely better film by any meaningful objective criteria, but Soderbergh is a lot more self-aware than Fellini. Or at least a lot more willing to make an honest acknowledgement of his mistakes. And that, coupled with the film's taking refuge in absurdity, makes this a very worthwhile watch.

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By Brahkage: An Anthology, Volume 1

This week's episode is a long one solely for the plethora and variety of material we're tasked with talking about. Stan Brahkage was an experimental filmmaker and a long-time film professor at the University of Colorado, who principally focused on non-narrative film. By Brakhage covers work from six decades of his career. With over four hours of material in 26 pieces ranging from 9 seconds to 74 minutes long, there's a lot to digest: a lot to love and some, well, not to.

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The Rock

Frequent and wonderful guest Donovan Hill joins us once more - and it's been far too long - for Michael Bay's debut film 1996's The Rock, a movie that may actually be a videogame? Kinetic is probably the best descriptor for the film, and in the spirit of that keneticality Donovan kicks us off by recommending two other movie podcasts that he compares us disfavorably to and frequently stops talking while googling the IMDB pages for minor characters. Thanks, Donovan. Merry Christmas!